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Chatham sex beast jailed for three years

A sex offender who disguised himself as an elderly woman to approach and sexually assault people in Chatham and Maidstone has been jailed for three years.

Paul Reed was dressed in women’s clothes when he approached three victims between late 2017 and early 2019, despite being the subject of a Sexual Harm Prevention Order.

The 56-year-old, of Gorse Avenue in Chatham, pleaded guilty to three sexual assaults, against three victims, and eight breaches of a sexual harm prevention order. He was sentenced at Maidstone Crown Court on Monday 1 July 2019.

The court heard in December 2017 Reed, who had his face partially covered, approached a girl in a school uniform at a bus stop in Maidstone town centre.

After engaging in a conversation with her, he inappropriately touched the victim before she ran to a nearby shop for help.

The next offence took place at around 1pm on Sunday 30 December 2018 and saw Reed sit next to a woman who was waiting for a bus in Sorrell Road, Chatham.

He was wearing a scarf that partially concealed his face and complained to her that it was cold. He then inappropriately touched her as she waited for the bus.

The final offence took place in March 2019. Like the previous incident in Chatham, Reed was dressed as a woman when he approached a victim in Chatham High Street.

He engaged in conversation with her and inappropriately touched her while wrapping a scarf around her shoulders.

At the time of each offence, Reed was the subject of the subject of a Sexual Harm Prevention Order due to previous incidents of a similar nature.

The order prohibited him from approaching any woman unknown to him, unless it was inadvertent or not reasonably avoidable.

He was also banned from covering his face in a public place with any item of clothing.

Police Constable Jacqueline Little, an investigating officer for the case, said: ‘Reed has persistently shown himself to be a nuisance to women and his behaviour cannot be allowed to go unchallenged.

‘Despite numerous restrictions being placed on him, he continued to breach them and caused a significant amount of distress in the process.

‘The sentence imposed is entirely justified and I am pleased he is no longer able to cause distress to innocent members of the public.’